Cape Peninsula

Cape Peninsula

[wpcol_1quarter id="" class="" style=""]

False Bay Coast to The Point

False Bay coast to Cape Point

[/wpcol_1quarter] [wpcol_1quarter id="" class="" style=""]

The spine of the Peninsula

The spine of the Peninsula

[/wpcol_1quarter] [wpcol_1quarter id="" class="" style=""]

Atlantic side Noordhoek to Kommetjie

Atlantic side Noordhoek to Kommetjie

[/wpcol_1quarter] [wpcol_1quarter_end id="" class="" style=""]

Hout Bay from Chapmans Peak Drive

Hout Bay from Chapman's Peak Drive

[/wpcol_1quarter_end]

A tour of the scenic Cape Peninsula is regarded by many as a highlight of their visit to Cape Town and indeed South Africa.

The rugged sandstone mountains that form the spine of the Peninsula rise to above 1 000 meters in places and stretch from the famous Table Mountain to Cape Point, the slopes of which are carpeted with the unique fynbos vegetation.

Over 2 600 fynbos plant species make this area a smorgasbord for the botanical enthusiast, while bird watchers visiting Cape Town seek the many endemic bird species that also call this area home. Add to this the number of coastal bird species that can be found along the magnificent shoreline, and you have a birdwatching destination that should not be missed.

Due to the low nutritional value of the fynbos, there has always been a low density of browsing herbivores. Many of the mammals found are small nocturnal carnivores that feed on the birds, rodents, reptiles and insects. However, some species, particularly the small to medium ungulates, are being reintroduced into the reserves and present good viewing and photographic opportunities.